Interview with Grace Alenoma on parenting & academia in Ghana

As a mother and an African wife, there is always too much to do at the family level due to gender role stereotyping and social expectations of women, wives and mothers. Caught in all these, the research aspect of my career suffered. As a mother academic in my institution, work is allocated without any consideration of a mother having extra responsibility at home.

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Interview with Amanda Gorham on Post-partum Depression

A woman who has the courage to raise children and advance her education simultaneously should be celebrated.  And accommodated.  Especially when her mental health is so vulnerable….I dream of a day when there is a “mother-focused model”.  An academic trajectory that allows mothers to complete their degrees at the same time as their non-mother peers by adjusting the course-level requirements and program-level expectations. 

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Interview with Kerrie Walkem on the well-being of parents & carers working in academia

It is important not to put yourself last.  You need to fill up your own tank, as the happier you are, often the better a parent (and employee) you will be.  This includes the obvious things such as eating well, prioritising sleep, and exercising (exercise has been found to decrease stress and help prevent perinatal depression).  It also means regularly doing things you enjoy just for you. Looking after yourself means that you are more able to care for your child.  When you look after yourself you are also looking after your child.

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Interview with Assistant Professor Anna CohenMiller on travelling to conferences with kids

Now that the kids are a bit older, I look both into the safety and cultural practicalities of travel, and also into the areas of town that have playgrounds or outdoor areas to explore. General online searches can help with the first items, but I have found going on Instagram and looking for hashtags about the location can be very helpful. This is how I found nice outdoor play areas to explore in Budapest. Also checking websites that focus on family-friendly travel, like Bebe Voyage, can be very helpful. 

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Interview with Dr Scott Jones on relocating for a job with a family.

Often, academics don’t have loads of time to do the grunt-work necessary to find the right place for them and their family. Online research can only do so much. One thing that helped us overcome this struggle was reaching out to my future colleagues. This was helpful in many ways. Which neighborhoods are actually safe (even if the online peanut gallery disagrees)? How far is too far out of town? What sort of commute is there, and options for ride-sharing/public transit? Of the options of nearby cities, what’s the flavor and culture of each? Asking (and getting answers!) to these questions were instrumental in our family finding a home that fits who we are and want to become, within our small budget.

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Interview with Associate Professor Alan Duffy on taking paternity leave in academia

Be clear about what you value and what you can afford. Academia can be flexible but make no mistake that a part-time role (I’m 0.4 for the remainder of my daughter’s first year) is not going to allow you to deliver on all your research goals. But I want this time with her, and I want to support my wife’s return to her work and career, so it’s a no brainer for me. However, it won’t be for everyone and that’s fine, just ensure you have that conversation with your partner (and bank balance!) so that it’s a planned decision and not one that happens by default.

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