Posts tagged academia
The toll of short-term contracts

Sophie Pelisson loves her job as a data scientist for Frateli Lab, a Paris-based R&D organization promoting equal opportunities in education. But it’s a far cry from the academic career she had in mind as she completed her astrophysics Ph.D. at the Paris Observatory in 2012. She applied for permanent research and university positions, which in France are won through nationwide competitions, but her efforts came to no avail, leaving her increasingly frustrated with the French research system.

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Effort–reward imbalance and overcommitment in UK academics: implications for mental health, satisfaction and retention

This study utilises the effort–reward imbalance (ERI) model of job stress to predict several indices of well-being in academics in the UK: mental ill health, job satisfaction and leaving intentions. This model posits that (a) employees who believe that their efforts are not counterbalanced by sufficient rewards will experience impaired well-being and (b) feelings of ERI are more frequent and damaging in employees who are overcommitted to the job.

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Breaking the silence: the hidden injuries of neo-liberal academia

How are you? I am totally stressed at the moment, to be honest. Work is piling up and I’m just drowning. I don’t know when I’m going to have time to start on that secrecy and silence book chapter – I’m so, so late with it now, and I feel really bad that I’m letting Roisin down, but I literally never have a second. I know, I know exactly what you mean. I mean, I had 115 e-mails yesterday and they all needed answering.

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Burnout and depression in academia: a look at the discourse of the university

Burnout and depression are no strangers to academics. For both students and faculty, these psychological phenomena can plague and even end careers. In this article, it is proposed that burnout and depression among both graduate students and faculty are a primary manifestation of the underlying discourse that is prevalent among many academic institutions.

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Artful research approaches in #amwritingwithbaby: qualitative analysis of academic mothers on facebook

This study contemplates one facet of academic motherhood through the use of artful research approaches in qualitative research to examine the (im)balance of being a mother writing academic works while raising and caring for a young child, as presented in an online hashtag Facebook campaign, #amwritingwithbaby. Specifically, this study uses an analysis of online posts and arts-based representations of findings through a comparison of narrative, poem, and word clouds.

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The phenomenon of doctoral student motherhood/mothering in academia: cultural construction, presentation of self, and situated learning

This study examined the phenomenon of doctoral student motherhood/mothering in academia in a unique way by utilizing (1) an interdisciplinary theoretical framework,(2) examining the experiences of doctoral students who have become mothers for the first time, and (3) by integrating visual data collection into a phenomenological study. Participants included four doctoral student mothers from across colleges at one university

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Affecting solidarities: bringing feeling into feminism, empathy in employment and compassion in academic communities of crises

While a wider context of crisis and neoliberal practices engulfing academia has triggered a variety of debilitating impacts on both education and academic working lives, tourism academia remains an insulated workplace, slowly responding to efforts corresponding to a politics of care, diversity and inclusivity. In highlighting attention to the issue of gender equity in tourism academia, this paper draws on netnographic analysis from one global electronic mailing list and analyses empirical data on the issues of 'gender', 'women' and 'diversity'.

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Australia's casual approach to its academic teaching workforce

Australian academics’ response to the Changing Academic Profession (CAP) survey indicates that they are among the least satisfied academics in the world. This dissatisfaction has been expressed after two decades of rapid growth in the student body and structural changes in the academic workforce, particularly an expansion in the amount of teaching provided by casual staff.

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Sleepless in academia

The conditions under which women academics work provide the impetus for this article. Current trends in feminist and other writing are moving us away from dwelling on the disadvantages women experience in the academy. Yet the findings from the two Canadian studies reported here suggest that issues around children and career, anxieties about evaluation, and fatigue and stress shape the daily lives of women academics.

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It's "like walking on broken glass": Pan-Canadian reflections on work-family conflict from psychology women faculty and graduate students

Studies on work-family conflict amongst university faculty members indicate that women experience significantly more conflict in balancing their dual roles than their male counterparts. Research suggests that female faculty may be disadvantaged because of the norms structuring academic environments, which seemingly accommodate the life courses of men.

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"My life is too chaotic to practice what i preach": perceived benefits and challenges of being an academic women in family therapy and family studies programs

The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of female faculty in family therapy and family studies graduate programs. Specifically, we were interested in how female faculty members in these programs experienced their roles as academics, partners, and/or parents.

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Images, ideals and constraints in times of neoliberal transformations: reproduction and profession as conflicting or complementary spheres in academia?

The article deals with structural, cultural and habitual concepts, principles and ideals of parenthood in the German academic working context. It focuses on social processes of transformation and reconfiguration of reproduction and profession, which means within work and family spheres and especially within academia in times of neoliberalism, economisation and globalisation.

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Policies that make a difference: bridging the gender equity and work-family gap in academia

Purpose - This paper aims to highlight interventions that promote female (and male) faculty's ability to balance work-family issues at a specific academic institution, in response to a demand in the literature that examines the intersection between research and implementation of organizational policies within a university setting.

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"Rheumatology fellows' perception on training and careers in academia: the American College of Rheumatology Fellow Research and Academic Training Survey

Objective. To examine the perceptions of rheumatology fellows regarding their research training, mentoring, and interest in a career in academia. Methods. We solicited by e-mail 386 fellows in the American College of Rheumatology 2005-2006 fellow database to take an anonymous Internet-based survey addressing the topics of research training, mentoring, and interest in an academic career.

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Balancing parenthood and academia: work/family stress as influenced by gender and tenure status

The present research investigated the influence of gender and tenure status in academicians' experiences of balancing parenthood and an academic career. Men (n = 85) and women (n = 179) employed full-time in tenure-track academic positions with at least one child younger than the age of 16 responded via the Internet to a 36-item questionnaire assessing experiences and perceptions regarding work and family demands.

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