Posts tagged motherhood
Academic mothers as ideal workers in the USA and Finland

The purpose of this paper is to explore how women academics experience academic motherhood in the USA and Finland, how they time their pregnancy in an academic career, and the ways in which the different policy environments and academic opportunity structures in each country shape the management of academic work and care work during maternity leave.

Read More
Visual arts as a tool for phenomenology

In this article I explain the process and benefits of using visual arts as a tool within a transcendental phenomenological study. I present and discuss drawings created and described by four participants over the course of twelve interviews. Findings suggest the utility of visual arts methods within the phenomenological toolset to encourage participant voice through easing communication and facilitating understanding.

Read More
Artful research approaches in #amwritingwithbaby: qualitative analysis of academic mothers on facebook

This study contemplates one facet of academic motherhood through the use of artful research approaches in qualitative research to examine the (im)balance of being a mother writing academic works while raising and caring for a young child, as presented in an online hashtag Facebook campaign, #amwritingwithbaby. Specifically, this study uses an analysis of online posts and arts-based representations of findings through a comparison of narrative, poem, and word clouds.

Read More
The phenomenon of doctoral student motherhood/mothering in academia: cultural construction, presentation of self, and situated learning

This study examined the phenomenon of doctoral student motherhood/mothering in academia in a unique way by utilizing (1) an interdisciplinary theoretical framework,(2) examining the experiences of doctoral students who have become mothers for the first time, and (3) by integrating visual data collection into a phenomenological study. Participants included four doctoral student mothers from across colleges at one university

Read More
Antenatal risk factors for postpartum depression: a synthesis of recent literature

Postpartum nonpsychotic depression is the most common complication of childbearing, affecting approximately 10–15% of women and, as such, represents a considerable health problem affecting women and their families. This systematic review provides a synthesis of the recent literature pertaining to antenatal risk factors associated with developing this condition.

Read More
Academic life and motherhood: variations by institutional type

This paper explores the interface between work and family at different types of institutions from the perspective of women faculty who are on the tenure track and who are mothers of young children. Such a perspective provides insight into institutional variation on academic life in general, and for new faculty as mothers in particular. A macro view of the findings points to two major concerns: time (and lack thereof) and its impact on the “ideal worker” norms that shape what it means to be a good mother and good professor at different institutional types; and, the idea of “choice” as an illusion.

Read More
Sleepless in academia

The conditions under which women academics work provide the impetus for this article. Current trends in feminist and other writing are moving us away from dwelling on the disadvantages women experience in the academy. Yet the findings from the two Canadian studies reported here suggest that issues around children and career, anxieties about evaluation, and fatigue and stress shape the daily lives of women academics.

Read More
Obstetric risk factors for postnatal depression in urban and rural community samplesds

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine obstetric risk factors for postnatal depression in an urban and rural community sample, with concurrent consideration of personality, psychiatric history and recent life events.Methods: This was a prospective study with women planning to give birth in one of the four participating hospitals recruited antenatally.

Read More
Getting a job: is there a motherhood penalty?

Survey research finds that mothers suffer a substantial wage penalty, although the causal mechanism producing it remains elusive. The authors employed a laboratory experiment to evaluate the hypothesis that status-based discrimination plays an important role and an audit study of actual employers to assess its real-world implications.

Read More